Discover the linkage between GRI and CDP


CDP GRI

Main findings

All information requested in the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire can be reused in a GRI G4-based report, on the condition that the climate change related Aspects[1] (Energy, Emissions, Products and Services, Public Policy) have been identified as material. Material means that the topic is relevant for the company while has impacts on the stakeholder that the company tries to manage.

Under GRI Guidelines, there are two types of information that can be reported: General Disclosures, giving information about the overall economic, social and environmental background, and Specific Disclosures, under which organizations report on the topics/aspects considered material.

In this sense, G4 General Disclosures have a broader meaning than the CDP corresponding questions, and can then be reused in the CDP questionnaire and adapted to the context of climate change, while the other way around is trickier, as CDP questions are only linked to climate change.

For the Standard Disclosures, we recommend to directly consult the document. All details and matching tables can be found here: https://www.globalreporting.org/resourcelibrary/GRI-G4-CDP-2016-Climate-Change-Linkage-Document.pdf?dm_i=4J5,4509P,LP4UW0,F1FH5,1

Linking standards: a relevant reporting approach

In the linkage document, GRI and CDP explain the importance of aligning on international recognized standards and to merge them whenever possible. We at DFGE also support this approach through our Sustainability Intelligence Model. Indeed, documents can be reused to answer different requests, which can be time-saving for companies. It is important to answer through recognized standards as they are usually multi-stakeholder and independent, assuring a representation of all parties in an objective and unbiased way. Moreover, standards are a tool to compare the performances of various companies and to identify best practices.

How to answer CDP or GRI

CDP and GRI are sustainability reporting frameworks, meaning that companies need to implement some actions before being able to report anything. DFGE can help you define and implement your actions. Also, DFGE can support you through the CDP process via assessing your carbon footprint, answering the questionnaire or performing a response check. In addition, DFGE can define the report contents according to GRI. Please feel free to contact us for more information at info@dfge.de

More information about CDP:  https://www.cdp.net/en-US/Pages/HomePage.aspx
More information about GRI: https://www.globalreporting.org/Pages/default.aspx

[1] The word Aspect is used in the GRI Guidelines to refer to the list of subjects covered by the Guidelines (e.g., Energy, Emissions, Products and Services)

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DFGE has just signed a 3-year partnership agreement with CDP


CDPToday, 22nd of April is Earth day. To support environmental initiatives, DFGE is happy to extend the fruitful partnership with CDP for the next three years.

A partnership aiming at helping respondent companies

DFGE has been an official Silver Climate Change Consultancy Partner of CDP since 2014, to support companies responding to CDP. DFGE and CDP have now signed a 3-year partnership contract to extend this collaboration. DFGE believes that CDP is one of the key drivers in climate change reporting, and thinks that the initiative will keep growing as the topic keeps becoming more important for stakeholders.

Indeed, climate has been gaining momentum over the past few years, to the point that the UNFCCC countries opted for the Paris Agreement in 2015.

To help companies take part in CDP, DFGE supports companies by providing official response checks following CDP methodology. DFGE can help companies formalize an environmental management system and can assess the carbon footprint of any organization. DFGE’s purpose is to support respondent companies in the best possible way.

To read the full press release, please consult: http://dfge.de/en/dfge-cdp-partnership/

A partnership beneficial for CDP and DFGE

DFGE is also happy to help extend CDP programs, by raising awareness on them and providing technical feedback. In exchange, CDP provides an in-depth training on CDP methodology. DFGE and CDP collaboration also features co-hosting of webinars, participation to events, promotion of partners on communication and more.

For instance, DFGE took part to the CDP DACH Spring event. In this sense, DFGE was aware of new methodology changes, could support CDP and could meet CDP respondents. DFGE had the opportunity to take part in a workshop called “Market Place”.

The Market place aims at empowering attendants with quick knowledge. There were 4 sessions of 15 minutes, so participants could cover 4 topics among the 12 workshops.

Marketplace

DFGE 15-minute session focuses on the link between CDP and SDGs. By taking part in CDP, organizations already help addressing the SDGs, the new 2030 sustainability agenda powered by the United Nations. DFGE also gave tips and recommendations to companies to tackle such objectives and show how they are already part and parcel of the companies’ sustainability strategies and actions.

For more information, please contact us at info@dfge.de

 

Towards more due diligence in the supply chain


Background story: The majority of our blog posts deals with CSR topics; we write about the latest developments in this field and try to relate it to a company’s daily business. Our background stories have a different perspective: Here, we explain trends, scientific background and societal implications of corporate sustainability – sometimes with a personal touch.

 

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Due diligence in the supply chain

Our partner EcoVadis recently hosted the Sustain event. EcoVadis unlocks the power of transparency in the supply chain, enabling buyers and suppliers to communicate on the results of a sustainability assessment through a collaborative platform. As such, EcoVadis offers a tool for sustainable procurement management, e.g. including social and environmental criteria within the supply chain. This topic has gained so much momentum over the past few years that it is now the object of legislation.  We try to explain thisphenomenon in this blog article, while describing solutions for companies faced with such issues.

Lack of transparency in the supply chain with outsourced impacts

Outsourcing has been growing for the past two decades. According to Deloitte, “the last two decades have been a significant rise in offshoring to external service providers”[1], though a small portion of companies are bringing some outsourced functions back to their home country. In this sense, the environmental and social impacts of production are now still mainly located in the supply chain level. Some events showed that the risks still exist and that scandals impacted the whole supply chain.

In April 2013, the Rana Plaza building collapsed, leaving more than 1,100 casualties and thousands of people injured in Bangladesh[2]. This building housed five factories for the garment industry. This disaster was covered by the media and shed light on the fact that clients don’t know what happen in their supply chain, and that basic safety rules and laws are not applied there. According to the Guardian, “investigators say several factors contributed to the building’s collapse: it was overloaded with machines and generators, constructed on swampy land, and the owner added floors in violation of the original building plan”.[3]

The same year, Europe was stained by the scandal of horsemeat, where horsemeat was sold as beef, showing the lack of transparency within a globalized supply chain. Many other examples could be found in this sense, but our point here is that there is a need for companies to tackle somehow these issues in their supply chain, for the suppliers’ sakes as well as theirs and their clients. [4]

Legislation as a driver for companies to tackle these issues

After these scandals, governments decided to act and to boost companies. Here are a few developments from the past three years.

Since May 2015, companies responding to certain criteria need to publish a statement on the actions they take to prevent slavery and human trafficking, according to the UK Modern Slavery Act.

In the US, the California Transparency in Supply Chain Act, some companies need to disclose in their websites the company’s actions to prevent such abuses.

France is trying to do the same, the bill on due diligence is still in validation by the government instances[5].

In case of non-compliance, some actions can be taken. In any case, companies will suffer from brand-damage, pressure from stakeholders, potential lawsuits …

These developments show that working conditions can be at risk in the supply chain, and that client companies have the power to investigate and require some practices from their suppliers. How can they tackle such issues?

Due diligence in the supply chain: solutions

First we recommend companies to edict clear requirements and made commitments, in the shape of public policies and statements

Then, companies need to let their suppliers/subcontractors know these requirements, so that they can act accordingly.

Suppliers don’t have the same level of risk according to their location, activity or size. We suggest companies to proceed to a risk-mapping. According to the level of risks, actions can be taken.

For instance, suppliers can be asked to be evaluated on their sustainability management system, for instance through EcoVadis or other sustainability assessments platforms.

For suppliers with high-risk level, we recommend having regular audits there, on sustainability topics, made by third parties, and by some members of the companies.

Then, what is key is collaboration and transparency. It is important that buyers, who are in touch with suppliers on a daily basis, are aware of such requirements, to explain them and pass it over to the suppliers. In this sense, we suggest different tools and approaches: training of buyers, dedicated team to help buyers in this sense; business reviews between suppliers and buyers, supplier scorecard including such topics, …

Reaching to your supplier is one thing. Reaching to the supplier of your supplier is another thing. In this sense, we recommend the use of EcoVadis as it enables to cascade requirements in the supply chain. Indeed, clients have their suppliers rated on their sustainability management system, including on how the suppliers handle their supplier sustainability management. Then, if the suppliers improve their own sustainable procurement practices, companies already reach another level in their supply chain.

Finally, we think that collaboration and knowledge sharing is key to success. We advise companies to train their suppliers, raise awareness through handbooks and code of conduct, organize seminars etc.

Last but not least, partnership with a local NGOs can help address the issues on the field and have more visibility on what is happening in the high-risk zones.

We know that it is hard for companies to reach such levels of the supply chain. However, we hope that this articles gives inspiration to solve such complex issues. If you are interested in solutions and consulting services, please contact us at info@dfge.de or consult our EcoVadis webpage.

Resources:

Article on latest regulations http://www.supplychainbrain.com/content/single-article-page/article/the-emerging-compliance-hot-topic-for-2016-regulations-regarding-trafficked-coerced-labor/

UK Modern Slavery Act: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2015/30/contents/enacted

 California Transparency in Supply Chain Act: http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/164934.pdf

Sources:

[1] P.5, Deloitte’s 2014 Global Outsourcing and Insourcing industry http://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/us/Documents/strategy/us-2014-global-outsourcing-insourcing-survey-report-123114.pdf

[2] http://www.cleanclothes.org/safety/ranaplaza

[3] http://www.theguardian.com/world/rana-plaza

[4] http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/horsemeat/

[5] https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/mandatory-human-rights-due-diligence-government-1-devoir-poitevin?trk=hp-feed-article-title-share

Discover DFGE’s new website!


Dear readers, we are happy to inform you that we have changed our website design and content. You can find it here:  http://dfge.de/en/. In this article we briefly explain the main changes and how we hope you will benefit from our relaunched website.

A new structure based on our Sustainability Intelligence approach

DFGE’s Sustainability Intelligence approach aims at leveraging the life of companies by reusing existing and available data to reusethem for other standards, and making the link through them.

DFGE_solutions_explained_large

In this sense, our offer is built around Sustainability management: we transform existing data (calculation), we include them in sustainability reporting frameworks (reporting). We also help companies plan their strategy, implement their actions and review these actions with dedicated KPIs. All these processes are documented and can be reused in calculation and reporting – this is Sustainability Intelligence.

Thus our website is structured around calculation, reporting and management.

New pages following new market trends

Since 1999, DFGE has been specializing in carbon footprint reporting and environmental management. Over the past few years, DFGE has noticed increasing participation in CSR standards such as United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), EcoVadis, GRI[1],… DFGE has extended its competencies to better support companies in their current challenges, from CO2 emissions to a broader CSR/sustainability strategy.

In this sense, you can find new webpages on our EcoVadis and GRI support.

We have just signed a partnership with EcoVadis and will provide response checks of questionnaires as a starter package. The complete package features a fill-in questionnaire and a prioritized CSR improvement strategy with dedicated feedback on current documents and practices.

Our GRI support enables us to help companies identify their main impacts and topics of interest, and to prepare the contents of CSR report following the GRI G4 Guidelines.

A more visual website

To ensure a nice visitor experience, we made sure to structure the pages in different blocks and to reduce the amounts of texts and. For instance, the background information about a dedicated standard can be found at the bottom of the page, if you decide to expand the text blocks.

new website

Blog integration

Our blog is moving and will be integrated in our new website – for the next couple months we will feed all new blog articles here on our external blog and in parallel on our new blog at http://dfge.de/blog/

There will be a special announcement for the final move – we hope you will like the new blog style.

We would be happy to receive your feedback at info@dfge.de. Happy reading!

[1] See our blog entry on growing CSR trends for more information

Be part of the growing CSR reporting trend!


Background story: The majority of our blog posts deals with CSR topics; we write about the latest developments in this field and try to relate it to a company’s daily business. Our background stories have a different perspective: Here, we explain trends, scientific background and societal implications of corporate sustainability – sometimes with a personal touch.

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You already have heard this acronym at work, and even came across a CSR report, and you will hear even more. Indeed, CSR reporting is growing.

CSR reporting is a communication tool on dedicated topics.

You may wonder: what is CSR reporting? There are different scientific and accepted definitions. Our definition is: any documentation related to the company’s management and performance regarding social and environmental topics that is disclosed publicly, and which aims at informing the stakeholders of how the companies manage the impacts towards them.

A stakeholder is said to be any party affected by the organization’s operations: shareholders, customers, suppliers, employees, local communities, civil society, industry, government… CSR reporting is then a tool to communicate the organization’s efforts to the impacted stakeholders.

We identified some of the main CSR reporting schemes

To bring more value to your reporting, you can use reporting standards and schemes. Although there are many CSR schemes, standards, ratings, we chose to focus on the ones which are leading in terms of influence and companies participating and which are not-for-profit organizations. The following list is then not exhaustive.

Regarding environmental reporting, you can choose to answer the CDP questionnaire, on water, climate change, or forest management. CDP[1] (Carbon Disclosure Project) is an NGOs collecting environmental data to ensure transparency to decision-makers like investors or clients.

To structure your CSR report, you can opt for two options: use the framework suggested by the United Global Compact, or use the GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) Guidelines.

When you adhere to the UNGC 10 principles[2], you have then to report your progress on a Communication On Progress. This can be a good idea for beginners, as this communication offers a structure which is not too much stringent.

Read our article for a full overview: https://blog.dfge.de/2015/01/29/un-global-compact-dfge-publishes-2015-cop-report/

For more experienced reporters we will suggest to use GRI Guidelines[3], where companies can identify the topics which are the most relevant for them and their stakeholders, and then report specific indicators accordingly (see our blog article for more information: https://blog.dfge.de/2015/11/25/understand-gri-in-2-minutes/).

CSR reporting has grown steadily over the past fifteen years

Over the past decade, CSR reporting has become mainstream. The figures show that the use of internationally recognized standards and schemes is steadily growing. This can be explained by the fact that these initiatives are multi-stakeholder, hence they are more objective than a stand-alone reporting. They also provide guidance and structure which can help the company identify gaps to improve on some areas.

GRI trends

(data extracted from the search function of GRI database, http://database.globalreporting.org/search)

UNGC trends

(data extracted from UNGC infographic Communication on progress, 2015 key facts,https://www.unglobalcompact.org/docs/communication_on_progress/cop-key-facts-2015.pdf)

CDP, in its 2015 activity report, indicates that they analyzed 1799 responses in 2010 against 1997 in 2015, showing also a growing participation. The number of signatories has also been increasing.CDP trends

(data extracted from CDP Global Climate Change Report 2015, https://www.cdp.net/CDPResults/CDP-global-climate-change-report-2015.pdf )

It means that companies have an advantage to report through these schemes: they are of interest for investors, clients, and other stakeholders.

What are the next trends in CSR reporting?

We believe that reporting will increasingly focus on sectorial-specific issues. Indeed, now that the general framework is somehow set and recognized by organizations, some more specific information can be added.

For instance, the Telecommunications sector is faced with the problematic of conflict minerals. Electronics companies now report on how they implement due diligence process in their supply chain and declare if they are conflict-free for the following materials: gold, tin, tantalum, tungsten. A dedicated guidance is provided by the CFSI (Conflict Free Sourcing Initiatives).[4]

We also think that more and more SMEs will report their CSR progress – as bigger companies will increase their pressure on suppliers to take the next step and report along the whole supply chain.

DFGE can guide you through your reporting process. Don’t hesitate to contact us for more information at info@dfge.de or consult our website.

 

[1]CDP: https://www.cdp.net/en-US/Pages/HomePage.aspx

[2] UNGC: https://www.unglobalcompact.org

[3] GRI: https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/g4/Pages/default.aspx

[4] CFSI: http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/conflict-minerals-reporting-template/http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/conflict-minerals-reporting-template/http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/

image link: https://pixabay.com/en/success-curve-hand-finger-touch-1093889/

CDP Climate Change – Änderungen im Fragebogen im Jahr 2016 und neue Bewertungsmethode


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Das CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) hat seinen CDP Climate Change Fragebogen für 2016 verändert.

Was ist CDP?

Über CDP veröffentlichen etwa 6000 Organisationen ihre Treibhausgas-Emissionen und andere umweltbezogene Leistungskennzahlen; dazu werden sie von ihren Anteilseignern oder ihren Kunden aufgefordert. Die Erwartung ist, dass Unternehmen dadurch besser in der Lage sind, dem Klimawandel zu begegnen.

Was sind die wichtigsten ?

  • Änderung der Bewertungsmethode: Die bisherige Aufteilung in disclosure score und performance band wird durch eine einzige Bewertung ersetzt, die die Stufen leadership (A), management (B), awareness (C) und disclosure (D) kennt (identisch zur im letzten Jahr eingeführten Bewertungsmethode für CDP Water). Die im Fragebogen gegebenen Antworten tragen zur Gesamtbewertung bei; mindestens 75% der Punkte müssen in einer Bewertungsstufe erreicht werden, um die nächsthöhere Stufe zu erreichen.
  • Angleichung der Scope-2-Emissionsberechnung ans Greenhouse Gas Protocol. Unternehmen müssen nun erklären, ob die angegebenen Werte marktbasiert oder ortsbasiert berechnet wurden. Ortsbasiert heißt, dass die Berechnung auf Emissionsfaktoren des jeweiligen geographischen Gebiets basiert. Marktbasierte Zahlen beziehen sich auf Emissionsfaktoren des Stromlieferanten oder des individuell bezogenen Strom-Produkts. Um die Zahlen vergleichbar zu machen, müssen Unternehmen eine der Optionen wählen und die Angaben aus dem Vorjahr gegebenenfalls entsprechend umrechnen.
  • Erneuerbare Energien: Unternehmen haben jetzt die Möglichkeit, ihre Produktion und ihren Verbrauch an erneuerbaren Energien einzubeziehen, und können auch über ihre Ziele in diesem Bereich berichten.
  • Wissenschaftsbasierte Ziele (Science-based targets): Unternehmen müssen jetzt angeben, ob ihr Reduktionsziel wissenschaftsbasiert ist, d.h. ob es kompatibel mit dem Ziel ist, die Klimaerwärmung auf 2°C zu begrenzen.
  • Management-Gebühr: Unternehmen aus Nordamerika und Westeuropa, die am CDP Investor Programm teilnehmen, müssen nun eine Gebühr zahlen, um zur Finanzierung von CDP beizutragen. Die Basisgebühr beträgt 2.475€ (mit der Zusatzoption, einen höheren Beitrag zu leisten); es ist aber auch möglich, eine niedrigere, „subventionierte“ Gebühr zu wählen. Erstmalige Teilnehmer oder Firmen, die aufgefordert wurden, am Supply Chain-Programm teilzunehmen, müssen keine Gebühr zahlen.

Mehr Informationen (englisch):

Changes & Rationale Document: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-Climate-Change-changes-document-2016.pdf

CDP 2016 Climate Change scoring methodology Introduction:  https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-climate-change-scoring-methodology-2016.pdf

Scoring introduction 2016: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/Scoring-Introduction-2016.pdf

Accounting of scope 2 emissions: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-technical-note-Accounting-of-Scope-2-Emissions-2016.pdf

Als offizieller CDP-Partner kann die DFGE Ihnen detailliertere Informationen über die Änderungen geben bzw. Ihrem Unternehmen helfen, sich daran anzupassen. Mit einer eingehenden Prüfung Ihrer CDP-Antworten (CDP Response Review) können Sie sichergehen, alle Erfordernisse des neuen Fragebogens und der neuen Bewertungsmethode zu erfüllen. Kontaktieren Sie uns unter info@dfge.de oder +49.8192.99733-20.

 

 

CDP Climate Change – revised questionnaire for 2016 and new scoring methodology


P1050417

The CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) has updated its methodology for the year 2016 regarding the CDP Climate Change questionnaire.

What is CDP?

Through CDP, around 6,000 organizations disclose their greenhouse gases emissions and other environmental KPIs, on the request of the shareholders or their clients. Through measurement, organizations are expected to better manage climate change mitigation.

What are the main changes?

  • Change in Climate Change scoring methodology. There will no longer be a disclosure score and a performance band, but one score, which will be located on a four-band scale: leadership (A), management (B), awareness (C), disclosure (D), like already introduced for the CDP water program in 2015. Answers to the CDP questions may be eligible to points in the four scoring categories disclosure, awareness, management, leadership. At least 75% of points must be scored on a certain scoring level in order to advance to the next higher lever.
  • Alignment with GHG protocol for Scope 2 emissions. Organizations now need to explain if the figures are market-based or location-based. Location-based means that the calculation is based on a figure reflecting the geographical electrical grid. For market-based, this figure reflects the emissions of the product, or the supplier. As figures need to be comparable, organizations need to select one of the option and convert the figures from the 2015 report or figures for the new 2016 report accordingly
  • Renewable energy. Organizations have now the possibility to report their renewable energy production and consumption, as well as any renewable energy targets.
  • Science-based targets. Company now need to specify whether their reduction target is science-based, meaning in alignment with climate science recommendations and scenarios, to keep global warming below 2°C.
  • Management fee: Companies from North America and Western Europe responding in the CDP Investor Program will be charged a management fee to contribute to the funding of the CDP project. The basic fee is set at 2.475 EUR, with the option to make a higher contribution, or to choose a subsidized, lower fee. First-time responders, as well as companies responding to their customers via the Supply Chain Program do not need to pay a fee.

For more information, please consult:

Changes & Rationale Document: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-Climate-Change-changes-document-2016.pdf

CDP 2016 Climate Change scoring methodology Introduction:  https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-climate-change-scoring-methodology-2016.pdf

Scoring introduction 2016: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/Scoring-Introduction-2016.pdf

Accounting of scope 2 emissions: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-technical-note-Accounting-of-Scope-2-Emissions-2016.pdf

As a CDP official partner, the DFGE is happy to provide more details on these changes and help your organization adapt to them. With our in-depth CDP Response Review, you can make sure you cover all requirements from the new questionnaire and scoring methodology. Please contact us at info@dfge.de or +49.8192.99733-20