Tag Archives: changes

CDP Climate Change – revised questionnaire for 2016 and new scoring methodology


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The CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) has updated its methodology for the year 2016 regarding the CDP Climate Change questionnaire.

What is CDP?

Through CDP, around 6,000 organizations disclose their greenhouse gases emissions and other environmental KPIs, on the request of the shareholders or their clients. Through measurement, organizations are expected to better manage climate change mitigation.

What are the main changes?

  • Change in Climate Change scoring methodology. There will no longer be a disclosure score and a performance band, but one score, which will be located on a four-band scale: leadership (A), management (B), awareness (C), disclosure (D), like already introduced for the CDP water program in 2015. Answers to the CDP questions may be eligible to points in the four scoring categories disclosure, awareness, management, leadership. At least 75% of points must be scored on a certain scoring level in order to advance to the next higher lever.
  • Alignment with GHG protocol for Scope 2 emissions. Organizations now need to explain if the figures are market-based or location-based. Location-based means that the calculation is based on a figure reflecting the geographical electrical grid. For market-based, this figure reflects the emissions of the product, or the supplier. As figures need to be comparable, organizations need to select one of the option and convert the figures from the 2015 report or figures for the new 2016 report accordingly
  • Renewable energy. Organizations have now the possibility to report their renewable energy production and consumption, as well as any renewable energy targets.
  • Science-based targets. Company now need to specify whether their reduction target is science-based, meaning in alignment with climate science recommendations and scenarios, to keep global warming below 2°C.
  • Management fee: Companies from North America and Western Europe responding in the CDP Investor Program will be charged a management fee to contribute to the funding of the CDP project. The basic fee is set at 2.475 EUR, with the option to make a higher contribution, or to choose a subsidized, lower fee. First-time responders, as well as companies responding to their customers via the Supply Chain Program do not need to pay a fee.

For more information, please consult:

Changes & Rationale Document: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-Climate-Change-changes-document-2016.pdf

CDP 2016 Climate Change scoring methodology Introduction:  https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-climate-change-scoring-methodology-2016.pdf

Scoring introduction 2016: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/Scoring-Introduction-2016.pdf

Accounting of scope 2 emissions: https://www.cdp.net/Documents/Guidance/2016/CDP-technical-note-Accounting-of-Scope-2-Emissions-2016.pdf

As a CDP official partner, the DFGE is happy to provide more details on these changes and help your organization adapt to them. With our in-depth CDP Response Review, you can make sure you cover all requirements from the new questionnaire and scoring methodology. Please contact us at info@dfge.de or +49.8192.99733-20

 

 

Freely chosen employment: a focus of EICC Code of Conduct latest version


Background story: The majority of our blog posts deals with CSR topics; we write about the latest developments in this field and try to relate it to a company’s daily business. Our background stories have a different perspective: Here, we explain trends, scientific background and societal implications of corporate sustainability – sometimes with a personal touch.

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The EICC Code of Conduct – 5.1 version was released in January 2016 to include stringent requirements on the fight against forced and bonded labor.

A sectorial initiative to tackle CSR issues

The EICC is a nonprofit coalition of electronics companies comprised of more than 100 electronics companies with combined annual revenue of over $3 trillion, directly employing more than 5.5 million people. The companies are committed to supporting the rights and wellbeing of workers and communities worldwide affected by the global electronics supply chain.[1]

To do so, a Code of Conduct was set up, and the coalition provides training and assessment tools regarding environmental, social and ethical responsibilities.

The Code of Conduct was launched in 2004, and has been adapted and changed to match the evolution of these themes. The version 5.1 has been released on the 1st of January 2016 and will come into force from the 1st of April 2016.

Change in freely chosen employment section

The only change from version 5.0 released in November 2014 to the version 5.1 of January 2016 focuses on freely chosen employment (section A,1).

The version 5.0 states that “workers shall not be required to pay employers or agents recruitment fees or other aggregate fees in excess of one month’s salary. All fees charged to workers must be disclosed and fees in excess of one month’s salary must be returned to the worker.”, whereas the 2016 version reads that “workers shall not be required to pay employers’ or agents’ recruitment fees or other related fees for their employment. If any such fees are found to have been paid by workers, such fees shall be repaid to the worker.”

This means that the requirements are strengthening. Before, there was a limit which is no longer tolerated. Our understanding is that a common practice of forced labor is indeed that employees have to pay a fee to be employed, either to the employer or to a recruiting agent. However, they usually cannot afford it right away, so they remain in debt to the employer or recruiting agent, so they have to keep working in the company at least to be able to pay this employment fee.

This more stringent requirement can be explained in a larger context where forced labor is still existing. For instance, the NGO Verité’s two-year study of labor conditions in electronics manufacturing in Malaysia found that “one in three foreign workers surveyed in Malaysian electronics was in a condition of forced labor.”[2]

Tackling forced labor issues

There are different ways to tackle this existing issue:

  • Risk-mapping to identify where cases are most likely to happen
  • Action plans accordingly
  • Actions can feature:
    • Specific HR procedures preventing unreasonable restrictions on entering or existing the facilities, forbidding employment fees, prohibiting the confiscation of immigrant documents
    • Training of HR population in this sense
    • Whistle blowing system to detect and treat such cases
    • Audits to check the status of such actions

For more information, please contact us at info@dfge.de or read the EICC Code of conduct: http://www.eiccoalition.org/media/docs/EICCCodeofConduct5_1_English.pdf

[1] http://www.eiccoalition.org/about/

[2] http://www.verite.org/research/electronicsmalaysia

image source: https://pixabay.com/en/document-agreement-documents-sign-428334/