Tag Archives: GRI

Discover the linkage between GRI and CDP


CDP GRI

Main findings

All information requested in the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire can be reused in a GRI G4-based report, on the condition that the climate change related Aspects[1] (Energy, Emissions, Products and Services, Public Policy) have been identified as material. Material means that the topic is relevant for the company while has impacts on the stakeholder that the company tries to manage.

Under GRI Guidelines, there are two types of information that can be reported: General Disclosures, giving information about the overall economic, social and environmental background, and Specific Disclosures, under which organizations report on the topics/aspects considered material.

In this sense, G4 General Disclosures have a broader meaning than the CDP corresponding questions, and can then be reused in the CDP questionnaire and adapted to the context of climate change, while the other way around is trickier, as CDP questions are only linked to climate change.

For the Standard Disclosures, we recommend to directly consult the document. All details and matching tables can be found here: https://www.globalreporting.org/resourcelibrary/GRI-G4-CDP-2016-Climate-Change-Linkage-Document.pdf?dm_i=4J5,4509P,LP4UW0,F1FH5,1

Linking standards: a relevant reporting approach

In the linkage document, GRI and CDP explain the importance of aligning on international recognized standards and to merge them whenever possible. We at DFGE also support this approach through our Sustainability Intelligence Model. Indeed, documents can be reused to answer different requests, which can be time-saving for companies. It is important to answer through recognized standards as they are usually multi-stakeholder and independent, assuring a representation of all parties in an objective and unbiased way. Moreover, standards are a tool to compare the performances of various companies and to identify best practices.

How to answer CDP or GRI

CDP and GRI are sustainability reporting frameworks, meaning that companies need to implement some actions before being able to report anything. DFGE can help you define and implement your actions. Also, DFGE can support you through the CDP process via assessing your carbon footprint, answering the questionnaire or performing a response check. In addition, DFGE can define the report contents according to GRI. Please feel free to contact us for more information at info@dfge.de

More information about CDP:  https://www.cdp.net/en-US/Pages/HomePage.aspx
More information about GRI: https://www.globalreporting.org/Pages/default.aspx

[1] The word Aspect is used in the GRI Guidelines to refer to the list of subjects covered by the Guidelines (e.g., Energy, Emissions, Products and Services)

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Discover DFGE’s new website!


Dear readers, we are happy to inform you that we have changed our website design and content. You can find it here:  http://dfge.de/en/. In this article we briefly explain the main changes and how we hope you will benefit from our relaunched website.

A new structure based on our Sustainability Intelligence approach

DFGE’s Sustainability Intelligence approach aims at leveraging the life of companies by reusing existing and available data to reusethem for other standards, and making the link through them.

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In this sense, our offer is built around Sustainability management: we transform existing data (calculation), we include them in sustainability reporting frameworks (reporting). We also help companies plan their strategy, implement their actions and review these actions with dedicated KPIs. All these processes are documented and can be reused in calculation and reporting – this is Sustainability Intelligence.

Thus our website is structured around calculation, reporting and management.

New pages following new market trends

Since 1999, DFGE has been specializing in carbon footprint reporting and environmental management. Over the past few years, DFGE has noticed increasing participation in CSR standards such as United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), EcoVadis, GRI[1],… DFGE has extended its competencies to better support companies in their current challenges, from CO2 emissions to a broader CSR/sustainability strategy.

In this sense, you can find new webpages on our EcoVadis and GRI support.

We have just signed a partnership with EcoVadis and will provide response checks of questionnaires as a starter package. The complete package features a fill-in questionnaire and a prioritized CSR improvement strategy with dedicated feedback on current documents and practices.

Our GRI support enables us to help companies identify their main impacts and topics of interest, and to prepare the contents of CSR report following the GRI G4 Guidelines.

A more visual website

To ensure a nice visitor experience, we made sure to structure the pages in different blocks and to reduce the amounts of texts and. For instance, the background information about a dedicated standard can be found at the bottom of the page, if you decide to expand the text blocks.

new website

Blog integration

Our blog is moving and will be integrated in our new website – for the next couple months we will feed all new blog articles here on our external blog and in parallel on our new blog at http://dfge.de/blog/

There will be a special announcement for the final move – we hope you will like the new blog style.

We would be happy to receive your feedback at info@dfge.de. Happy reading!

[1] See our blog entry on growing CSR trends for more information

Be part of the growing CSR reporting trend!


Background story: The majority of our blog posts deals with CSR topics; we write about the latest developments in this field and try to relate it to a company’s daily business. Our background stories have a different perspective: Here, we explain trends, scientific background and societal implications of corporate sustainability – sometimes with a personal touch.

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You already have heard this acronym at work, and even came across a CSR report, and you will hear even more. Indeed, CSR reporting is growing.

CSR reporting is a communication tool on dedicated topics.

You may wonder: what is CSR reporting? There are different scientific and accepted definitions. Our definition is: any documentation related to the company’s management and performance regarding social and environmental topics that is disclosed publicly, and which aims at informing the stakeholders of how the companies manage the impacts towards them.

A stakeholder is said to be any party affected by the organization’s operations: shareholders, customers, suppliers, employees, local communities, civil society, industry, government… CSR reporting is then a tool to communicate the organization’s efforts to the impacted stakeholders.

We identified some of the main CSR reporting schemes

To bring more value to your reporting, you can use reporting standards and schemes. Although there are many CSR schemes, standards, ratings, we chose to focus on the ones which are leading in terms of influence and companies participating and which are not-for-profit organizations. The following list is then not exhaustive.

Regarding environmental reporting, you can choose to answer the CDP questionnaire, on water, climate change, or forest management. CDP[1] (Carbon Disclosure Project) is an NGOs collecting environmental data to ensure transparency to decision-makers like investors or clients.

To structure your CSR report, you can opt for two options: use the framework suggested by the United Global Compact, or use the GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) Guidelines.

When you adhere to the UNGC 10 principles[2], you have then to report your progress on a Communication On Progress. This can be a good idea for beginners, as this communication offers a structure which is not too much stringent.

Read our article for a full overview: https://blog.dfge.de/2015/01/29/un-global-compact-dfge-publishes-2015-cop-report/

For more experienced reporters we will suggest to use GRI Guidelines[3], where companies can identify the topics which are the most relevant for them and their stakeholders, and then report specific indicators accordingly (see our blog article for more information: https://blog.dfge.de/2015/11/25/understand-gri-in-2-minutes/).

CSR reporting has grown steadily over the past fifteen years

Over the past decade, CSR reporting has become mainstream. The figures show that the use of internationally recognized standards and schemes is steadily growing. This can be explained by the fact that these initiatives are multi-stakeholder, hence they are more objective than a stand-alone reporting. They also provide guidance and structure which can help the company identify gaps to improve on some areas.

GRI trends

(data extracted from the search function of GRI database, http://database.globalreporting.org/search)

UNGC trends

(data extracted from UNGC infographic Communication on progress, 2015 key facts,https://www.unglobalcompact.org/docs/communication_on_progress/cop-key-facts-2015.pdf)

CDP, in its 2015 activity report, indicates that they analyzed 1799 responses in 2010 against 1997 in 2015, showing also a growing participation. The number of signatories has also been increasing.CDP trends

(data extracted from CDP Global Climate Change Report 2015, https://www.cdp.net/CDPResults/CDP-global-climate-change-report-2015.pdf )

It means that companies have an advantage to report through these schemes: they are of interest for investors, clients, and other stakeholders.

What are the next trends in CSR reporting?

We believe that reporting will increasingly focus on sectorial-specific issues. Indeed, now that the general framework is somehow set and recognized by organizations, some more specific information can be added.

For instance, the Telecommunications sector is faced with the problematic of conflict minerals. Electronics companies now report on how they implement due diligence process in their supply chain and declare if they are conflict-free for the following materials: gold, tin, tantalum, tungsten. A dedicated guidance is provided by the CFSI (Conflict Free Sourcing Initiatives).[4]

We also think that more and more SMEs will report their CSR progress – as bigger companies will increase their pressure on suppliers to take the next step and report along the whole supply chain.

DFGE can guide you through your reporting process. Don’t hesitate to contact us for more information at info@dfge.de or consult our website.

 

[1]CDP: https://www.cdp.net/en-US/Pages/HomePage.aspx

[2] UNGC: https://www.unglobalcompact.org

[3] GRI: https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/g4/Pages/default.aspx

[4] CFSI: http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/conflict-minerals-reporting-template/http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/conflict-minerals-reporting-template/http://www.conflictfreesourcing.org/

image link: https://pixabay.com/en/success-curve-hand-finger-touch-1093889/

SDGs: a topic of interest for companies


 

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On the 17th of February, DFGE co-animated a webinar on Sustainable Development Goals with the World Environment Center. For those who missed it, we summarize the main conclusions of the webinar in this article.

The webinar featured sustainability experts.

Elisa Tonda (Head of Business and Industry Unit, UNEP), Lorraine Francourt (Director, EH&S & Sustainability, EMEA & AP, The Dow Chemical Company), Wolfgang Berger (VP Business Development, DFGE- Institute for Energy, Ecology and Economy) and Terry F. Yosie (President and CEO, World Environment Center) presented current trends on how companies are using the Sustainable Development Goals and on how companies can address them.

Main highlights from the webinar

(1) The SDGs are becoming important because they provide an internationally approved framework to address global challenges. Business has a vital interest in a world free from human suffering and environmental degradation and finds it essential that coordinated and measurable action takes place.

(2) Companies find value in using the SDG’s, e.g. because they help identify and meet societal expectations, especially in developing markets where the major growth opportunities lie.

(3) Companies such as Dow Chemical are already applying the SDGs. They have gone through intense stakeholder consultations (both internally and externally) and have now embedded their sustainability goal-setting-process into a structure that allows for measuring and reporting on the SDGs. Dow sets goals for each of the SDG’s but not for each indicator. Even less ambitious companies that address just a few goals would be coherent with the United Nation’s objective: every company should find its own way of contributing to the SDGs.

(4) Companies can align the SDGs with their business strategies and existing reporting frameworks such as Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), UN Global Compact, and CDP responses. While the SDGs may have similar content to the aforementioned, these pre-existing initiatives and frameworks are generally more focused in certain areas. The SDGs are, instead, a framework to report on a company’s contribution to solve global challenges and enable a strategic perspective for companies that actively want to identify business opportunities for the common good.

A worldwide topic

It seems that companies show a deep interest in this topic. Slightly more than 100 sustainability experts attended the webinar. 74% were business representatives, while 26% were from academia, advisory firms, governments, and NGO’s. Geographical distribution was 49% from Europe, 38% from the US, 8% from Latin America and 5% from Northern Africa/Middle East/Pacific.

For more information, please consult: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs or our blog article on how to address SDGs: Companies are key to the success of the Sustainable Development Goals. You can also directly consult us at info@dfge.de

Video

Video: GRI Plenary on G4- Introducing the main features of G4


Plenary on G4- Introducing the main features of G4 from GRI on Vimeo.

Understand GRI in 2 minutes


What is the purpose of GRI?

GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) is an internationally recognized standard for CSR reporting to help organizations set goals, measure performance, and manage change in order to make their operations more sustainable. The guidelines are now in their 4th version (G4).

G4 process in a few words:
– Identify your company’s “Material Aspects”, e.g. the environmental, social and other CSR impacts that your organization is facing and how they relate to the broader sustainability context. In this sense, you will be focused only on what truly matters and how it impacts your stakeholders. When defining such issues, it is fundamental to consult them to match your organization’s priorities with theirs. This step is also called “Defining Report Content”.
– Prepare the data to be submitted in the report: the “General Standard Disclosures” (including “Material Aspects” and “Stakeholder Engagement”) and “Specific Standard Disclosures”, whose contents will depend on the “Identified Material Aspects”. Here you can choose the extent to which your company wishes to report, with “Core” and “Comprehensive” option. During this step, “Principles for Quality” are to be complied to make sure that the report is comparable, accurate, understandable,…
Write and shape the report. You can choose any structure, for instance according to your strategy’s pillars. You just need to include the GRI index showing the indicators can be found. If the report is not complete, a given statement will be added.
Publish your report and notify GRI.

What are the benefits?

  • Identify CSR priorities
  • Track performance
  • Benefit from competitive advantage
  • Enhance relations with stakeholders
  • Facilitate comparability

DFGE is happy to answer your questions and provide more support.

For more information, please consult the GRI-Website or check this video focusing on the differences between GRI3 and GRI4:

Supply Chain Sustainability – Leitfaden des UN Global Compact


Der United Nations Global Compact, bei dem auch die DFGE Mitglied ist, hat kürzlich seinen neue Leitfaden zur Transparenz in der Lieferkette veröffentlicht.

Der Leitfaden “A Guide to Traceability: A Practical Approach to Advance Sustainability in Global Supply Chains” kann hier als PDF von der UN Global Compact Seite bezogen werden.

Auch im Zusammenhang mit erweiterten Anforderungen an Scope 3 Emissionsermittlung aus dem Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) und den neuen Regeln für die Nachhaltigkeitsberichterstattung nach dem Global Reporting Initative (GRI 4), werden sich gerade Unternehmen aus dem Mittelstand mit einem deutlichen Anstieg an Detailfragen rund um Emissionsmanagement und Nachhaltikgeit konfrontiert sehen.

Mehr zur Nachhaltigkeitskommunkiation finden Sie bitte hier.